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Ever want to dive over 100 feet below the water’s surface, without going outside?  You can — if you’re in Brussels, home of Nemo 33, a 33 meter (108 feet) deep diving pit.   Built in 2004, Nemo 33 was designed by Belgian diver John Beernaerts who wanted to bring the diving experience of the Caribbean to his backyard.  At the cost of over $5 million over the course of seven years (and, as he told the The Sunday Times, four girlfriends), Beernaerts dream became a reality.

Nemo 33, pictured in part above (more here), features underwater caves at 33 feet deep and windows throughout, so visitors — and diners at the facility’s Thai restaurant – can view the features of the diving pit and watch as divers explore its depths.

The dive pit is open to the public and equipment is provided. Certified divers can use Nemo 33 for 22 Euro a day; us uncertified folks need to pony up another eight Euro.

Bonus fact:  All said and done, the average U.S. resident consumes (directly by drinking, or indirectly to produce the products we use) 2,483 cubic meters of water per year (data via here).  That’s about 2.5 million liters of water, the same amount as a standard, Olympic-sized swimming pool – and the amount of chlorine-free, filtered spring water in Nemo 33.

From the Archives: The World’s Largest Swimming Pool. Not as deep, but unfathomably large.

Related: The coolest backyard toy ever?  (And yes, it’s related to the above.)

Originally published

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